April 19 – May 12, 2024

The ZMP virtual lunch group began meeting early in the COVID-19 pandemic, and continues as a vital, informative, and supportive part of our art life. In this exhibit, we celebrate this impact by showing works influenced by the suggestions, examples, ideas, and processes learned during the weekly virtual lunch meetings.

 

The show, by intention, has not been curated in the normal sense; each member of the group was invited to submit one or two pieces of their own choice.

 

This exhibit is an opportunity for group members, as well as other viewers, to take part, and continue, our conversation.

Elisa Lanzi

Solar Plexus, monotype, Akua ink, relief, stencils, collage

Elisa Lanzi

We were in the thick of COVID 2020 when I began meeting with the group. At the time I was craving simplicity and soon, spare circular forms started showing up in my prints. When I shared them with the group they gently encouraged me to free things up – let those shapes explode with color and intersect! I made “Solar Plexus” right after that conversation. Being among artists with diverse expertise/experience (e.g., intaglio, artists’ books) gave my creative expression a real boost. Thank you, Virtual Lunch!

Doris W. Madsen

Hope Is A Discipline, paper bag, collagraph, screen print, monotype, acrylic paint, tissue paper

Doris W. Madsen

I value the constructive and encouraging ambience of the virtual lunch group and know I can always call on these artists for advice, opinions and constructive information. I love to think of it as Zea Mays outreach and consider it an essential element of my printmaking practice.

Susan Rood

Meet At Dusk, linocut collage

Susan Rood

The virtual lunch group provided comfort and companionship during the pandemic. For most of that stressful time, I created linocuts and assembled them using a grid system. The group continues to structure my week and makes me feel part of a community of printmakers in a similar way perhaps to working in a shared print studio space. Lunch participants are able to share techniques, recent work and discuss artistic issues that concern them.
Has it impacted my artwork? Perhaps, although I’m pretty focused on whatever path I’ve been following for these many years. For me, feeling part of a print group just encourages me to continue working.

Willa Cox

Abstract Narrative Twenty-Two, Accordion style book made of Khadi handmade paper; Images: monotype, gouache

Willa Cox

I had no idea what to expect when I joined this critique group at the beginning of the pandemic. It was the first I had joined since graduate school and I was wary about showing works-in-progress. Meredith Broberg, our host when the group began, quickly established a supportive, sensitive, and informed mode of conversation.

Soon, I was sharing my works-in-progress, gaining important insights, and learning from discussions about the work of other members. In the process, I have discovered techniques (gel monotype and clay monotype), tools, and materials that have added significant new dimensions to my work.

Through our meetings and related conversations or emails, I have formed friendships I value highly.

Peggy Merritt

Curious 1, solar plate intaglio on relief monotype

Peggy Merritt

Printmakers are communal creatures who thrive in the presence of fellow artists. In-person ZMP workshops, beginning in 2005, have helped me develop specific printmaking skills. I love the ZMP studios, but the long distance between my New Hampshire home and Florence kept me at the periphery of the ZMP community until the beginning of the virtual lunch program. Joining that program in April of 2020 has allowed me—and other printmakers across the country—to become part of the ZMP sustaining community. The weekly hour spent with ZMP friends and colleagues have become an integral part of my life and helps pace my studio work. The group critiques have encouraged me to explore and combine different printmaking processes and to develop more abstract forms.

Mary-Helen Horne

Denim reverie (ii), linocut relief monoprint

Mary-Helen Horne

Our ZMP Virtual Lunch group is an integral component of my artmaking process. So often, as I work, I ask myself what would the Virtual Lunch group think, and try to apply their presumed feedback. Then, I show it to them, and always get more than I expected.

Our varied perspectives, specializations, and tastes create an ideal forum for understanding how my work presents itself to the world. These thoughtful and articulate artists share honest, supportive opinions and ideas. They share technical advice, creative ideas (which I steal liberally), and compositional suggestions, all with kindness and insight.

I can’t imagine printmaking without Zea Mays, and I can’t imagine making art without the encouragement and friendship of these wonderful artists.

Meredith Broberg

Dominique, monotype

Meredith Broberg

Remember how daily life quickly collapsed under the pandemic lockdowns? Finding a way to connect with each other as artists felt like a lifeline. Since then, this format of sharing imagery, feedback, inspiration and technical resources shines bright as a beautiful silver lining to that global trauma. This group highlights what I love about the ZMP community: generosity, experimentation and encouragement. I’m grateful to the hosts and participants who make the Virtual Lunchtable so nourishing and lively. I look forward to returning when my own work life involves less screen time. This monotype begins a new series of portraits of past ZMP interns; I hope to include other ZMP folks over time.

Whendy Carter

Untitled Gold, collage monotype

Whendy Carter

Less than a year ago, I joined ZM and the VLG. This group went through Covid together and so initially, I felt like an outsider. Over time, and with encouragement, I began to share my own work and also began to follow my fellow artists’ work. And, over time, I became part of the group and the meetings became a cornerstone of my calendar. This past year’s work has been focused on a series that explores pattern, texture and color. At times, I have doubted the direction, only to receive positive feedback and support from my fellow artists. They have carried me through moments of doubt and have kept me on course! I am blessed to be part of this group, and I am grateful to call many of them my friends.

Annie Rogers

Fox, A Riddle, artist book

Annie Rogers

Experienced, generous artists every one of them, this group opened for me a variety of printmaking methods, including clay prints, gelli prints, relief prints, dry point ideas, and the idea of documenting my work in progress to see where I had been and may wish to go. I have loved seeing the signature work of others evolve over a long period of time and hearing each artist’s questions about their works in progress. I have written lyric lines alongside drawings and prints for years, but never had a space to share this with others over time. This group saw that I was drawn to negative spaces, handmade books, and muted colors. They welcomed me as a poet, a poetics integral to my visual work.

Sue Crosby Doyle

Paint Mines Color, drypoint with color

Sue Crosby Doyle

In 2020 through the recommendation of a fellow online artist, Jane Davies, I discovered ZeaMays printmaking. Being part of this group has a transformative experience for me. We show slides of our work that we want to discuss. These 2 prints I have hung are an example of one of the discussions about my Drypoint series I was working on. Someone suggested that I might try color. So I used my pan pastels. Something from the group I learned to use.

During our meetings, we engage in lively discussions about our work, sharing helpful tips and offering support when needed. It is truly remarkable to witness the level of camaraderie and passion among us. I have been immensely grateful for the three years I have spent with this talented group of individuals. I do not doubt that together, we will continue to push each other to new creative heights, and I am excited to see what the future holds.

Therese Dwyer Moriarty

The Quarry, collagraph, clay print, watercolor, drawing on handmade paper

Therese Dwyer Moriarty

I joined the Lunch Group fairly early and was immediately hooked on the intelligent, generous feedback and the feeling of camaraderie among the group.

Talking ‘shop’ with other artists is such a treat. I work in my home studio most of the time and don’t get to the Zea Mays Studio very often. This is a way to fill that gap. We share insights into each other’s work, give support, and discuss common issues. We share workshops, podcasts, and artists who inspire us.

I have learned about clay printing, watercolor screen printing, gelli printing along with helpful hints for drypoint, framing and color mixing to name a few.

The best part of this group is getting to ‘geek out’ about art with friends!

Dawn Emerson

Quiet Canyon, monotype with PanPastel on Arches 88

Dawn Emerson

Living in Central Oregon there is no printmaking studio near me, so the opportunity to learn and benefit from this group’s collective experience has been vital to feeling connected to the printmaking world at large. Over time we’ve gotten to know each other’s “style” and have seen how each other’s work has evolved. As a result, I feel there is a sense of a shared history among us that has built a sense of community, and the feedback and support we give to each other is informed by that shared history. Most importantly, sharing with this group has shown me new ways to look at my own work. I am less judgmental and more patient with myself as I explore and learn new ways to grow.

Louise Wallendorf

Hellenic Horse #1, bio based surf lithography

Louise Wallendorf

I broke my wrist in late 2020 during the peak of the pandemic. For more than a year, I wasn’t able to draw with my right hand the way I could pre-injury. The weekly group conversation gave me permission to do what I could and kept me from being very depressed during the recovery process.

Sarah E. Thomson

Untitled, monoprint

Sarah E. Thomson

I had intended not to be in this show since I have been an observer, not a sharer, at the virtual lunches these past years, but I was entreated to participate and here I am. I cannot say how the lunches have affected my work, however, because I am not working. I can say Wednesdays at one are a high point of my week, a time to see interesting work and people I care about in a supportive and encouraging atmosphere. I’m happy to learn new techniques and hear about new products and tools. The recommendations document is a great resource. And now that I have moved far away from Zea Mays the virtual lunch continues to provide a connection to that place I love.

Cathy Leather

Arctic Tern's Journey, monotype, animation and sound (QR code)

Cathy Leather

The opinions and critique I get from this group are so valuable because of the ability to float ideas to form consensus, which informs my artwork. Climate, nature and wildlife are my common subjects. Earlier this year I was trying to wrap my head around how to compose and create an idea I had about people floating on a sea of ice with the Thwaites Glacier in the background. This idea morphed into the Arctic Tern monotype submitted for this show mostly based on feedback from this group. My imagery changed, my intent modified and what emerged was satisfying to me and others. I am so grateful for the support and friendship of our group.

Bobbie Salthouse

Interconnected Web 2, relief Monoprint, stencil and freehand ink drawing

Bobbie Salthouse

For over 3 years I have found the of ZMP virtual lunch group to be an important part of my art life. The members’ thoughtful critiques have been extremely helpful in developing my work. The group was especially supportive of my creative process as I translated my sketchbook ideas into finished prints. Through sharing ideas and deepening friendships I have broadened my skills, gained confidence as a printmaker and perhaps most meaningfully, made lasting connections.