Icing Sugar Aquatint #3

Test Summary
This experiment tests a process developed by Andrew Baldwin in which icing sugar is used to create an aquatint. Methods learned from Andrew Baldwin were replicated in this experiment with the intention of producing a smooth, even aquatint. As a result of previous experiments, it was postulated that much more sugar was needed, so this experiment focused on using a larger amount of sugar.

Date: June 15, 2011
Researcher’s Name: Cara Borelli
Plate Material: Copper
Plate Size: 6 in x 6 in
Room Temperature: 72°, Low humidity

Plate Preparation
Plate was beveled, burnished, degreased using soy sauce, deoxidized, and BIG ground was applied.

For icing sugar application:
Application 1: Six tablespoons of icing sugar were sieved twice using a tea strainer. The sugar tray in the aquatint box was wiped clean of sugar with a clean rag. A hair dryer was used on high and cold to disperse the sugar throughout the box. The hair dryer hole was covered with a rag while the sugar settled. After 35 minutes the plate was analyzed.

Application 2: Eight additional tablespoons of icing sugar were sieved twice using a tea strainer. The sugar tray in the aquatint box was wiped clean of sugar with a clean rag. A hair dryer was used on high and cold to disperse the sugar throughout the box. The hair dryer hole was covered with a rag while the sugar settled. After 50 minutes the plate was analyzed and appeared to be well coated with lots of sugar dissolved into the ground and a lot of visible texture.

Baking the ground:
The plate was baked in the oven for 6 minutes and was left to sit in the oven for 30 minutes after baking was complete. The plate is very textured, much more so than previous plates.

Water Baths:
Water Bath 1: The plate is submerged in boiling water and agitated continuously by moving the tray the plate and water are in. After 10 minutes the plate is removed and dried with newspaper. The plate is now less textured to the touch. Through the magnifier, a few small copper dots are visible.

Water Bath 2: The plate is submerged in boiling water and agitated continuously for 10 minutes by moving the tray the plate and water are in. After 30 minutes the plate is removed and dried with newspaper.

Water Bath 3: The plate is submerged in boiling water and agitated continuously for 10 minutes by moving the tray the plate and water are in. After 30 minutes the plate is removed and dried with newspaper. Through the magnifier, the plate does not appear to be significantly different.

Water Bath 4: The plate is submerged in boiling water and was not agitated. After 15 minutes the plate is removed and dried with newspaper. Through the magnifier, the plate appears the same.

Etching Notes
This plate was not etched because it looked the same as the previous plates at this stage. Without a significant difference from the previous plates, it was not believed that this plate and the methods used would exhibit different results after being etched.

Timed Application of Mordant N/A

Removal of Grounds N/A

After Bath Evaluation N/A

Inking Methods N/A

Paper Type: N/A
Paper Soaking Time: N/A
Press Blanket Setup: N/A

Test Conclusion
Applying an average amount of ground to the plate and using a large amount of sugar does not result in a better aquatint. Later experiments will focus on applying less ground.

Icing Sugar Aquatint #4 >