Meredith Broberg

Meredith Broberg

Meredith Broberg

Meredith Broberg uses drawing, printmaking and photography as a means to investigate the natural world and the ways we are interconnected within it. She received her MFA from the University of California at Berkeley, focusing first on monotypes, then veering into installation and photography. Since then, Meredith has received several awards, including a Fulbright Fellowship to Costa Rica, and a scholarship to Anderson Ranch Art Center in Colorado. Her current work often takes the form of artists’ books. Meredith teaches book arts at Hampshire College.

Individualized Instruction

In courses, workshops and one-on-one sessions, my goal is to create the conditions for exploration and discovery. This usually involves working out the material and technical factors beforehand, and providing clear information and inspiring examples. Sometimes it’s also important to include prompts to creativity to help artists bypass the hindrances that can interfere with seeing, thinking and making. Whenever possible, I try to include time for careful looking and talking together about questions like: Have you seen this strength in your work? Have you considered these possible ways to develop this further? New discoveries can be tender seedlings, easily stunted by the demands of everyday life–encouragement and attention can help these possibilities to flourish.

I teach an Artists’ Books course at Hampshire College, which has helped me to develop ways of introducing a variety of structures to artists interested in working with the book form. In addition to training in bookbinding, I have wide-ranging experience in safer intaglio methods, monotype and photopolymer using drawn and painted imagery. I work with both Western and Asian papers, and often combine traditional techniques with plastic plates, which can be easy, versatile and relatively immediate. In my own work right now, I’m curious about the gaps and overlap between observation and representation, between evoking and describing. I’ve been experimenting with ways to combine intentional marks (such as drypoint lines) with organic processes (such as staining paper through capillary action), in hopes of developing images which can express layered realities.