Liz Chalfin

Liz Chalfin

Liz Chalfin

Liz Chalfin is founder and director of Zea Mays Printmaking and the studio’s resident artist. Liz has been involved in printmaking for the past 35 years. Liz teaches workshops at Zea Mays Printmaking, supervises the research at the studuio and takes the message and methods of safer printmaking on the road to schools and studios around the U.S through lectures, demonstrations and workshops. Liz received a B.A. (1980) and M.F.A. (1985) in printmaking. and served as a Lecturer in Art at Whittier College, California for nine years where she converted the traditional studio into a safer facility.  Liz chaired a panel entitled “The Green Print Studio: A Model for the 21st Century” at the 2009 Southern Graphics Council Conference and presented an etching demonstration using BIG grounds at the 2014 Southern Graphics Council Conference.  She has been on numerous panels discussing contemporary printmaking and has served as a juror in national exhibitions.   Her prints and artist’s books are exhibited internationally and are in numerous public and private collections including the Smith College Museum of Art, The DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park, The Hood Museum, The Boston Public Library, The Portland Museum of Art, Bowdoin College Art Museum, Museo Internacional de Gravura, Alijo, Portugal, San Alejandro Academy of Fine Arts in Havana. Liz is a member of the Boston Printmakers, The Monotype Guild of New England, The Los Angeles Printmaking Society and the Southern Graphics Council International. www.lizchalfin.com

Individualized Instruction

My expertise is in the technical aspects of printmaking and problem solving printmaking challenges. I am interested in knowing what it is you want to express and then helping you find the most eloquent means of expression. My own experience as director of Zea Mays Printmaking has enabled me to master many of the intricacies of non-toxic etching, alternative photo printmaking (photopolymer), collagraph and monotype with both water-based and oil-based inks and some relief processes. All of these methods have found their way into my own art making, sometimes by themselves, and sometimes in combination with one another. I especially enjoy the challenge of figuring out how to make things work. It is important to me that the artists I work with understand the “why” behind the “what” so that they can move from playful exploration to intentional image making with confidence and knowledge.